Who we’ve helped


Our team has helped many organizations achieve inspired results. Below is a small sample of such results.

  1. iOpener worked with Focus Solutions, a publicly-listed technology business, to build support for the initiatives of a new CEO; the primary measurable outcomes were the launch of a new technology platform and an increase in the company’s share price. The iPPQ was administered company-wide and, based on the findings, a series of meetings, workshops, and targeted coaching, was designed. One year later the iPPQ was re-administered, displaying significant improvements in all targeted areas; further, the new technology system had launched successfully and the share price had increased significantly.
  2. iOpener worked with the non-profit organization NHBC, who were looking for assistance in navigating a difficult transition period (reducing the workforce by 2,000 employees) while aiming to maintain their position in the Best Company Index in 2009 and 2010. In this instance, the iPPQ was used as an individual coaching tool among managers, with action plans being designed based on the results and individual consultations. Despite approximately 2,000 layoffs, NHBC navigated the turbulent transition well while maintaining their desired position on the Best Company Index.
  3. Innocent Drinks recruited iOpener to increase the confidence of their financial management team while trying to complete an acquisition by Coca-Cola which was currently in jeopardy of falling through. Initial iPPQ assessment confirmed a lack of confidence, as well as a high desire to quit among employees. iOpener administered a confidence-building workshop for the team and, three months later, confidence scores had improved significantly and the acquisition was successfully completed. Given the severity of the initial situation, iOpener organized an additional ‘innoculation’ session in 2010 to maintain confidence levels in the long-term.
  4. Vodafone, a leading UK cellular phone service company, similar to Verizon in the US, recruited iOpener to help build trust amongst an extended management team. The primary measurable outcomes were an increased ability to meet deadlines and conduct key conversations. The iPPQ was used as an initial assessment tool and confirmed the lack of trust within the organization; iOpener then designed a trust-building workshop followed up by coaching sessions among the managers. Ongoing tracking of the outcome measures suggest that deadlines are being met more frequently and key conversations are becoming noticeably more regular.
  5. In addition to corporate projects, iOpener is currently involved in projects with the UK Ministry of Defense (MoD) and the National Health Service (NHS). iOpener is working with the MoD to determine the factors that increase happiness in different regions of Afghanistan, as well as to determine the positive outcomes of promoting happiness in these regions. The initial findings show that fostering happiness in personnel in Afghanistan can lead to a number of positive outcomes, particularly in the area of civic involvement and assisting with critical reconstruction projects.
  6. iOpener won a public tender to improve the coaching abilities of managers within the National Health Service (NHS). iOpener designed a two-stage program based on self-efficacy research and coaching techniques. This is an ongoing project, with approximately 20 iterations of the program completed to date, resulting in the training of around 250 NHS employees.
  7. An operations team managing a fleet of 5,000 delivery vehicles recovered only 20% of the refunds possible from service providers.  Suppliers were invited, got engaged and partnered well with the team.  Much to everyone’s surprise, the suppliers collaborated with each other to provide better service by sharing resources.  The team implemented changes using rapid improvement cycles called “Kaizen” over a three month period. Recovery rates increased to over 90%, and savings totaled over $500K annually.
  8. Laboratory personnel within a Hospital reported low morale and high turnover. Leadership was in question, and changes were needed. Using a Performance Consulting approach, interviews surfaced several themes including “process inconsistencies”, and a lack of sense of team. We needed to improve communication: weekly team meetings were a great first step.  Team members learned to appreciate and help each other succeed. During the “Lean” process, the most important development was transferring the responsibility of scheduling from a single person to the entire team. This allowed team members to redefine their roles in the laboratory as well as open a new line of communication between technical staff and management. The atmosphere and demeanor of everyone has become more upbeat and cheerful, and the hospital is now able to fully staff the lab 24/7.
  9. Management wanted to give the “Lean” system a try at their Distribution Center (DC).  Most people were skeptical, but several employees indicated an interest and participated in a week long lean training event.  During the week, the team was exposed to many different principles and tools. Within 18 months, the DC core team engaged nearly every employee on a lean team and completed 168 “Kaizens” resulting in over $500K in annual savings.
  10. Lead times in Accounts Payable were variable, causing suppliers to frequently request status updates. When an “assigned specialist” was absent or on vacation, work for that supplier would be delayed. Time spent verifying, validating, and issuing payment was frequently delayed due to variable processes, and exceptions caused further delays and dissatisfaction. The AP Team learned to create current and future state value stream maps. Office cells were implemented to flow work into newly created centers of excellence. High volume, low complexity invoices were handled by one cell, and highly complex, low volume accounts were sent to a second cell. A high speed machine was purchased to eliminate redundant entries and increase throughput.  Job rotation and cross training within the cells ensured that “Specialists” soon transformed into “Generalists” capable of handling five different processes. The result was that lead time was reduced from ten days to three days.
  11. A financial organization in Canada’s east coast was experiencing growth and change which was triggering fear. We helped the senior team express their “dream outcomes” and brought out a genuine desire to have everyone contribute their talents to the success of the organization. This was like high octane fuel. They met their targets, in fact exceeded them. What this reinforced is that there is no limit, no ceiling to the amount of talent in a team.
  12. A senior member of a leadership team at an International Fortune 500 company felt that even with the success he had achieved in his professional and personal life so far, much more could be achieved. His instincts told him that if he unlocked his full potential, so much more could happen. After just one coaching session, the results speak for themselves. Excerpts from an email “Good to hear from you. Things are wonderful. Some highlights: I wake up calm with an eagerness for work. I don’t fret over decisions – I just do things. Feel fearless but reality aware. Approaching things without that block of “can’t do it” or “don’t know how”. Overall – really good. Have to watch the activity level as I am like a whirling dervish getting stuff done now without anything holding me back.
  13. A newly forming health care group in Central Canada was fearful, angry, and blaming, at a time when health care is experiencing much demand and many obstacles in terms of service delivery. We designed and facilitated sessions to encourage “interest based” rather than “positional” thinking.  Moving participants from a mindset of “Do I really have to be here” to complete engagement gave them insight and hope that their talent, collaboration and desire can help shape the future.
  14. Io Consulting was experiencing communication challenges that came in the way of completing their business goals. BigLife worked closely with the management team over several years to give their executive management staff the tools they need to manage communication and overcome obstacles by presenting options when needed, or “pushing” when needed. This helped the executive team make the hard choices they needed to make to help propel the company forward.
  15. A client at Merrill Lynch was transitioning to becoming a financial advisor. She felt she lacked a strong personal foundation from which to build her business. Her coaching sessions helped her identify her values and gain a better understanding of her personal strengths. This led to her developing a strong value proposition and mission statement. With this sound foundation, she has been able to reflect a much more confident persona allowing prospects to have greater faith in her abilities.”

In 2006 – 2007, iOpener worked with Focus Solutions, a publicly-listed technology business, to build support for the initiatives of a new CEO; the primary measurable outcomes were the launch of a new technology platform and an increase in the company’s share price. The iPPQ was administered company-wide and, based on the findings, a series of meetings, workshops, and targeted coaching, was designed. One year later the iPPQ was re-administered, displaying significant improvements in all targeted areas; further, the new technology system had launched and the share price had increased significantly.

In 2008 – 2009, iOpener worked with the non-profit organization NHBC, who were looking for assistance in navigating a difficult transition period (reducing the workforce by 2,000 employees) while aiming to maintain their position in the Best Company Index in 2009 and 2010. In this instance, the iPPQ was used as an individual coaching tool among managers, with action plans being designed based on the results and individual consultations. Despite approximately 2,000 layoffs, NHBC navigated the transition while maintaining their desired position on the Best Company Index.

In 2009, Innocent Drinks recruited iOpener to increase the confidence of their financial management team while trying to complete an acquisition by Coca-Cola which was currently in jeopardy of falling through. Initial iPPQ assessment confirmed a lack of confidence, as well as a high desire to quit among employees. iOpener administered a confidence-building workshop for the team and, three months later, confidence scores had significantly improved and the acquisition had been successfully completed. Given the severity of the initial situation, iOpener organized an additional ‘innoculation’ session in 2010 to maintain confidence levels in the long-term.

In 2010, Vodafone, a leading UK cellular phone service company, similar to Verizon in the US, recruited iOpener to help build trust amongst an extended management team. The primary measurable outcomes were an increased ability to meet deadlines and conduct key conversations. The iPPQ was used as an initial assessment tool and confirmed the lack of trust within the organization; iOpener then designed a trust-building workshop followed up by coaching sessions among the managers. Ongoing tracking of the outcome measures suggest that deadlines are being more frequently met and key conversations are becoming noticeably more regular.

In addition to corporate projects, iOpener is currently involved in projects with the UK Ministry of Defense (MoD) and the National Health Service (NHS). iOpener is working with the MoD to determine the factors that increase happiness in different regions of Afghanistan, as well as to determine the positive outcomes of promoting happiness in these regions. The initial findings show that fostering happiness in Afghanistan can lead to a number of positive outcomes, particularly in the area of civic involvement and assisting with critical reconstruction projects.

In 2009, iOpener won a public tender to improve the coaching abilities of managers within the NHS. iOpener designed a two-stage program based on self-efficacy research and coaching techniques. This is an ongoing project, with approximately 20 iterations of the program completed to date, resulting in the training of around 250 NHS employees.